9/1/2018 - 4:00 pm

The Celestial Beauty Of Gothic Cathedrals

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Interior of Saint Peter cathedral in Beauvais, France / Photot: Shutterstock Interior of Saint Peter cathedral in Beauvais, France / Photot: Shutterstock

At a time when a new architectural style had conquered Europe, the major characteristics of the new style dictated that it would mostly serve sacral purposes. Gothic Cathedrals were designed to bring the faithful closer to God through visual experience. The indoor and outdoor support system helped Gothic buildings to reach to great heights while delivering light at ground level. The supporting system served at the same time a decorative function. This unique performance in combination with ornamental vaults, and last but not least the colour effects of stained-glass windows, were fascinating then and continue to charm us today.


Probably the best known cathedral ever - Notre Dame de Paris, France / Photo: Shutterstock


Saint-Étienne de Bourges - Cathedral in Bourges, France - the seat of the Archbishop of Bourges / Photo: Shutterstock


Duomo di Milano (Milan Cathedral), Italy / Photo: Shutterstock


Notre-Dame d'Amiens - Amiens, France, west facade / Photo: Shutterstock


Notre-Dame d'Amiens - Amiens, France, detail of west facade / Photo: Shutterstock


Notre-Dame d'Amiens - Amiens, crossing over the nave / Photo: Shutterstock


Notre-Dame d'Amiens - Amiens, beautiful stained glass windows / Photo: Shutterstock


Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France / Photo: Martina Advaney


Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France - detail to the west favade / Photo: Martina Advaney


St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague Castle, Czech Republic / Photo: Martina Advaney


St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague Castle, Czech Republic - Rosette in West Facade / Photo: Martina Advaney 


St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague Castle, Czech Republic - Supporting system / Photo: Martina Advaney 


St. Barbara's Church, sometimes referred to as the Cathedral of St Barbara, Kutná Hora, Czech Republic / Photo: Shutterstock


The construction did not always go without problems - an incomplete Liverpool Anglican Cathedral, United Kingdom / Photo: Shutterstock


Another example of incomplete cathedral - Saint Peter of Beauvais in Beauvais, in northern France/ Photo: Shutterstock


Saint Peter of Beauvais, France - Due to the collapse of the Choir in 1284 there was a radical rebuild in the following century. The cathedral still remains incomplete and several supporting precautions have been taken / Photo: Shutterstock

Read 1004 times Last modified on 10/1/2018 - 9:25 am
Martina Advaney

Martina is a designer with many years of experience, she writes articles on varied subjects and also conducts interviews.

 

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