For the past four years we had structure: school, work, and study. We had professors, mentors, and fellow students holding our hands along the path to our diplomas. Now most of us have moved back home and are on our own. Our clubs have new presidents, no more exams to study for, and we’re stuck with the sense that someone is going to come along to help us. The truth is, there is no guarantee that someone will.

After years-long consultations, ministers of home affairs and justice of the EU countries came to an agreement on common entrance and residency rules for non-EU students and researchers, which will significantly liberalize travel and mobility for young people from non-EU countries.

Young people and the actual job market demonstrate that there is a need to meet the dreams and the wishes of both sides; if you look at the topic deeper you will find that the perfect (or almost perfect) balance occurs when the employer’s needs and the candidate’s skills line up.

In recent decades the family has become the subject of investigation in numerous disciplines that highlight the strong impact of relations within the family on the educational development of the individual. The anthropological fact that underpins education is under the eyes of all: the human person is not, but becomes. To become herself/himself, the individual needs those who accompany her/him on this path, because the individual cannot make it alone. The first "other" that the child meets at the first moment, is then the parents, who are the link to the life which will become.

Change is a scary thing, especially if it involves your career. Many people get stuck in a career direction they dislike but refuse to make a change because they cannot overcome the fear of the unknown. If the paycheck is good and the office is close to home, why change your job, you may ask. If you are not appreciated enough or at all or if the work is mindless, if you spend most of your day surfing the Internet and you cannot wait to go home, you are in dire need of a career change. Here are some warning signs to watch for – they will tell you if it’s time to change your career or simply make some adjustments.

This article is the last in a four part mini-series called ‘Become a Pro in the Hot Seat at the Job Interview’, prepared by Shea Ki founder of Upgrade My Interview™especially for YT magazine. This time you will find out what questions are important to ask yourself before you accept any job offers.

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